Bassaaru and sabakki soppu pallaya | Dill leaves and lentil curry

by Priya
31 comments
0 Shares

This traditional and authentic Bassaaru and sabakki soppu pallaya from Karnataka, was taught to me by my help. This recipe calls for multiple steps but the end result is so tasty and highly nutritious.

Step by step instruction on making Bassaaru and sabakki soppu pallaya. This Karnataka style sambar / rasam is best served with Ragi mudde

Life with Ragi

I got married in 2003 and have been in Bangalore ever since. Before i write about anything else let me give you some details of the land : Karnataka that i call home. Karnataka formerly known as Mysore state was formed on November 1, 1956. The state has something for every person. It has a rich culture, has beaches, dense forests, hills and exciting cities. Other than rice, the staple for the people of Karnataka includes Ragi (finger millet). Ragi is also used in making ragi mudde, ragi kunji, laddoos and even cakes these days

Ragi kunji was a staple while growing up, but ragi mudde was a totally new food concept for me. I mean, one is supposed to gulp the ragi mudde with saaru and not bite into it?? How is that possible?? Having said that it is all about practice and we are getting there. For the past few years, our saturday lunch has been more or less the same, Ragi mudde with Saaru, many a times we have also switched the saaru with tamil style sambar or even dal. My help Nanjamma always says “ragi thin beku sakthi barum”, which translates to “eating ragi gives one strength”.

Step by step instruction on making Bassaaru and sabakki soppu pallaya. This Karnataka style sambar / rasam is best served with Ragi mudde

Bassaaru and sabakki soppu pallaya – how to make it ??

Recently my help showed us a very different variation of saaru, Bassaru. Bassaaru also roughly translates to “drained saaru” or “drained sambar or rasam”. This saaru is the perfect accompaniment to Ragi Mudde (finger millet flour balls). Bassaaru can be made with dill leaves, spinach leaves and averekkai also. For this recipe i have made Bassaaru with dill leaves and toor dal. This recipe has a series of steps and within those steps there is a lot of interlinking steps..sounds confusing isnt it but the end product is so good that the effort is all worth it.

Step by step instruction on making Bassaaru and sabakki soppu pallaya. This Karnataka style sambar / rasam is best served with Ragi mudde

For this month’s Shhhhh Cooking Secretly Challenge, us food bloggers are cooking recipes from Karnataka. This month i was paired with Amrita Iyer from The Food Samaritan and she gave me dill leaves and toor dal as my secret ingredients. This gave me the perfect opportunity to make Bassaaru and sabakki soppu pallaya.

shhh-secretly-challenge-image

Couple of other posts that you might like to read:

1) Homemade Sambar Powder Recipe: South Indian style
2) Dantin Soppu (Greens with coconut)

Print Recipe
Ragi Mudde with Bassaru
Step by step instruction on making Bassaaru and sabakki soppu pallaya. This Karnataka style sambar / rasam is best served with Ragi mudde
Course Main Dish
Cuisine Indian
Prep Time 30 minutes
Cook Time 30 minutes
Servings
people
Ingredients
Course Main Dish
Cuisine Indian
Prep Time 30 minutes
Cook Time 30 minutes
Servings
people
Ingredients
Step by step instruction on making Bassaaru and sabakki soppu pallaya. This Karnataka style sambar / rasam is best served with Ragi mudde
Instructions
Making the dal
  1. In a pressure cooker, add dill leaves, salt, some green chillies with 2 cups of water and pressure cook for 2 whistles (here we ensure that the dal / lentil is just cooked and does not get mashed completely
  2. Once the pressure is released, drain just the liquid part of the dal mix into a different utensil and let it cool. Remove the dry dill leaves & undercooked dal into another vessel
Making the ground mixture
  1. Heat some oil in a kadhai and add jeera, garlic, oinions and little salt. Saute on low flame.
  2. Add sambar powder, jeera powder, coriander powder and chiili powder and mix gently
  3. To this add cinnamon, cloves, half of the coconut and tamarind paste and mix well
  4. Add corinader leaves to this mixture and remove from flame / gas and let the mixture cool
  5. Once cooled, grind the mixture into a smooth paste
  6. Portion into 3/4th and 1/4th quantities in two separate bowls
For tempering
  1. Heat oil in a kadhai, add mustard seeds and let it splutter
  2. To this, add jeera, garlic, hing, curry leaves, dried red chillies, onions and sautee till the onions turn pink and soft.
  3. Remove from flame / gas and let this cool
  4. Divide this into two portions
Making the Bassaaru
  1. To the liquid portion of the dal which we have separated, add one portion of the tempering and mix well
  2. To this liquid dal mix add 3/4th of the coconut groun mixture and bring the entire concoction to a boil
  3. Simmer for a couple of minutes and transfer to the serving bowl
Making the dill leaves dry dal
  1. In a kadhai, to the remaining tempering add the 1/4th ground mixture and mix well
  2. To the above mixture add the dry dill leaves and undercooked dal and mix well. Garnish with the remaining grated coconut
To serve
  1. .Check the salt in both the dry and the liquid dal and then serve as below
  2. In a plate, keep the ragi mudde in the centre, serve the liquid dal on one side and add the dry dill leaves - dall mix to another side
  3. Take a piece of the soft ragi mudde, dip it into the bassaaru ( liquid dal), take a small portion of dry dal mix and eat
0 Shares

You may also like

31 comments

Nyamat August 31, 2018 - 4:45 am

This looks quite interesting! Got to try it soon. 🙂

Reply
priya September 3, 2018 - 6:56 pm

Do and try and let me know 🙂

Reply
Nanditha August 31, 2018 - 5:56 am

Yummy! Looks incredible. You took me back to my Bangalore days when friends would bring mudde and palya.

Reply
priya September 3, 2018 - 6:55 pm

thank you for your kind words Nanditha

Reply
Prathima September 1, 2018 - 7:24 pm

My long time to do list very healthy n flavour full dish, urs look inviting

Reply
priya September 3, 2018 - 6:55 pm

Thank you Prathima

Reply
Vidya Narayan September 2, 2018 - 2:40 am

Healthy and nutritious platter indeed! The wholesome leafy vegetable with the ragi mudde is a perfect combination of all things nutrition. Loved it!

Reply
priya September 3, 2018 - 6:55 pm

thank you Vidya..it is now a staple in our house 🙂

Reply
Seema Doraiswamy Sriram September 6, 2018 - 7:42 am

Healthy and comfort to the core. cant find more words to describe this humble delicacy.

Reply
priya September 11, 2018 - 6:03 am

healthy to core and very delicious 🙂

Reply
PepperOnPizza September 6, 2018 - 8:04 am

What a lip smacking accompaniment to the ragi mudde! I have only had ragi mudde with a kind of channa side dish, not sure what it is called, but this saru seems the perfect fit.

Reply
priya September 11, 2018 - 6:04 am

Oh Sujata, you should have it with the traditional accompaniments, it tastes so nice

Reply
mayurisjikoni September 6, 2018 - 9:15 am

Wow, Priya this is definitely a new recipe for me but you have two main ingredients that I love dill and ragi. A healthy, nutritious filling dish. Bookmarking it.

Reply
priya September 11, 2018 - 6:02 am

Thank you Mayuri 🙂

Reply
Renu Agrawal Dongre September 6, 2018 - 11:42 am

I have to yet make this , but the thought of how to eat this, makes me stop as being a northie by food habits we did not had it much. But your description and your pics, are tempting me to try this healthy dish.

Reply
priya September 11, 2018 - 6:02 am

It is very healthy, do try it out 🙂

Reply
The Girl Next Door September 7, 2018 - 7:59 am

Ragi mudde and saaru is such a filling and healthy combination! Great post for the theme! 🙂
I have never tried making this at home, though. Should do soon.

Reply
priya September 11, 2018 - 6:01 am

Do try it Priya..you will def like the dal and palya 🙂

Reply
Anu Kollon September 8, 2018 - 2:25 am

This dish brought back so many memories from my childhood. Had these at my neighbor’s home while I was young. First pic with steel plate is perfect – it is just the way it needs to be served.

Reply
priya September 11, 2018 - 6:01 am

yup it is as traditional as it gets ..even the picture. This is how we always have it and so i had to take a picture like that 🙂

Reply
Aruna September 8, 2018 - 5:43 am

Ragi Mudde is a staple in my home but dill is something I have acquired a taste for only recently. However, I have always used it as flavouring and not as a main ingredient. This traditional recipe is something I am sure I will like.

Reply
priya September 11, 2018 - 6:00 am

Yes Dill does require some time..do try it out, i am sure you will like it 🙂

Reply
priya satheesh September 8, 2018 - 9:56 am

Interesting and flavourful curry.. I have never tried this.. will try this soon ! Thanks for sharing !

Reply
priya September 11, 2018 - 5:59 am

Do try Priya and let me know 🙂

Reply
Priya Suresh September 8, 2018 - 6:26 pm

Wow, what a healthy platter there. Such an authentic Ragi mudde, and that dill and lentils curry looks like a prefect side dish. Would love to finish that plate.

Reply
priya September 11, 2018 - 5:58 am

very health and so yumm 🙂

Reply
Amrita September 9, 2018 - 4:00 am

You have surpassed yourself with the secret ingredients! Lovely share!

Reply
priya September 11, 2018 - 5:58 am

humbled Amrita..thank you 🙂

Reply
veena September 9, 2018 - 11:49 am

It is ages since I had ragi mudde and your pics are so good that I need to try this soon. Bookmarked

Reply
priya September 11, 2018 - 5:57 am

Thanks Veena, love ragi mudde and it has become a staple at our house

Reply
kavitha June 13, 2019 - 7:54 pm

looks yum yum yummy ! will try it soon

missing Bengaluru.

Reply

Leave a Comment